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weaving in ends

  • Save Time by Doing Finishing Work as You Knit or Crochet!

    Save Time by Finishing As You Go!Finishing work is usually saved for the end of the project, but it doesn't have to be! There are plenty of easy ways that you can speed things up. Here are my favorite ways to add new colors or change skeins without weaving in ends.

    The Russian Join: This is a fantastic way to add a new skein of yarn to your work without weaving in any ends. It creates a steady, secure join, so it's great for most yarns.

    The Felted Join: Working with wool or another feltable yarn? Try the felted join! This technique locks your two yarns together, creating a solid join without a darning needle.

    Crochet over your ends: Why use a darning needle when you can use your hook? This quick strategy allows you to keep crocheting as you tuck your yarn ends into place.

    Do you have a time-saving tip? Be sure to share it in the comments below!

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  • How to Russian Join Yarn in 7 Easy Steps

    Hate weaving in ends? The Russian join is an excellent technique for attaching a new skein of yarn or for changing colors. Best of all, it creates a secure join, so you can keep crocheting or knitting without worrying about yarn ends! Here are instructions on how to complete the Russian join in 7 easy steps. I've used 2 different colors of yarn, but this is a great technique for attaching a new skein of the same color yarn, too!
    How to Russian Join Yarn in 7 Easy Steps
    1. Thread a blunt needle with one end of yarn.
    2. Work the needle through the plies of your yarn for a few inches. Don't worry if this looks bunched up now.
    3. Pull your working yarn through, leaving a small loop at the end. This is where the second piece of yarn will be attached.
    4. Thread your needle with the second piece of yarn, then insert the needle into the small loop you created before.
    5. Pull a few inches of yarn through the small loop.
    6. Like you did before, work the needle through the plies of your second piece of yarn.
    7. Give each strand a little tug to smooth out the bunching. You now have a secure join! Trim off any excess ends.

    That's all there is to it! Depending on your yarn, you may notice that this joined area is slightly thicker than the rest of your yarn. I find this isn't very noticeable when I've worked my projects, but it's something to keep an eye on.

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  • How to Crochet Over Your Ends

    Tired of weaving in ends whenever you reach a new skein in your crochet project? Avoiding crochet colorwork project because there are too many ends? Try crocheting over your ends! This easy technique allows you to keep on crocheting so that the end you have to weave in is the very last one. Here's how to do it.

    How to Crochet Over Your Ends

    You'll have two pieces of yarn: the working yarn and the tail you're weaving in (top image). Place the tail over the top of your next stitch (second image). Then, complete your stitch as normal (third image). This securely hides your tail in the middle of the stitch (bottom image). Continue in this manner until the entire tail has been used, then snip any excess yarn that may be sticking out. That's all there is to it! This technique is helpful for both stripes and solids, so get crocheting!

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