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charity knitting

  • Give A Sh*t: Knitting Through Cancer Treatment at Dana-Farber

    charity knitting kit

    In one form or another, many of us have felt the emotional turbulence that is the effect of cancer. Ourselves, a family member, spouse, friend. . . we hear and feel the stories of diagnosis and treatment and waiting and hoping. If you are here reading this then you probably also know and appreciate the healing and calming benefits of knitting (and crocheting). Lion Brand Yarn, Sh*t That I Knit, and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute recognize these realities and joined together to bring a piece of comfort to young adults going through cancer treatment.

    shit that I knit

    Give A Sh*t

    Sh*t That I Knit (STIK) is a Boston-based knitwear company that employs women from Lima, Peru, enabling them to stay home and care for their families while bringing in an income. They are a one-for-one company dedicated to bringing the comfort of knitting to the lives of young cancer patients. With each purchase through their site a knit kit is donated to a patient at Dana-Farber.

    The folks at STIK strongly believe in the therapeutic qualities of knitting and strive to pass that on, which is how the Give A Sh*t knitting kits were established. Every Kn*t Sh*t kit is packed in a tote bag (donated by Emulsion Printhouse) and includes Lion Brand yarn and needles and a pattern developed by the STIK team.

    give a sh*t

    Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

    In February 2017, the Young Adult Program (YAP) and Young and Strong Program for Young Women with Breast Cancer teamed up to deliver the Kn*t Sh*t kits to patients at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. These programs looked further than just the benefits of repetitive motions and sense of accomplishment in finishing a project. Offering the kits and a meeting space provides a social outlet for young patients to connect with others going through a similar situation.

    For more information on the program at Dana-Farber you can contact yap@dfci.harvard.edu. Kits are provided upon request to patients between the ages of 18-39.

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  • Losing Mom; Knitting Through Grief

    Just after Christmas, my 91-year old mother collapsed and disappeared into the fog of dementia, suddenly unreachable despite her body being still alive, and still here. And I began a long, slow submersion into grief that seemed, at times, to be dragging me down into the darkness where my mother had gone. Because she was alive, it seemed completely wrong to mourn for my missing mother.

    So I became busy instead. I stepped in and became the advocate for her care, the organizer of her visitors, the person whom her doctors and nurses called first rather than my father who was arguably more grief-stricken than me. The busyness helped fill my waking hours with calendars, discussions about care, creating and managing lists of tasks, writing detailed emails to my siblings and nephews. It also intruded on my nights, waking me up with sudden jolts of fear that I had forgotten something important that I needed to look into right that very minute. I worried that mom was inside herself, able to think clearly, but unable to communicate. I wanted someone to tell me how she felt, what she wanted.

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  • Project Knitwell Offers Comfort Through Crafting

    Knitting, crochet, and other kinds of crafting can have healing, comforting properties. Project Knitwell brings that exact form of comfort to those who need it.

    project knitwell knockers

    Lion Brand Yarn partners with Project Knitwell by donating yarn to their cause, so they can focus on helping people in need. In 2015, we published a booklet, titled The Comfort of Knitting, the proceeds of which are donated to Project Knitwell as well as the Alzheimer's Association.

    Carol Caparosa founded the group in 2010. She had experience with the extremely stressful situation that is being the parent of a child with health problems. She looked to knitting to help pass the time in waiting rooms while her daughter underwent multiple heart surgeries. This is when she realized that crafting provided a welcome distraction from her worries.

    Patients, families, and caregivers all benefit from the therapy of knitting. It can help with relaxation and positive thinking. Plus, it's a way to pass the time and create something tangible.

    Project Knitwell for Caregivers

    Project Knitwell operates in the Washington, D.C. area, but you can discover the comforts of crafting no matter where you live. 

    Our booklet, The Comfort of Knitting, doesn't just teach the basics. It features several beginner projects, as well. On top of that, there's a lot of really great information about the health benefits of knitting.

    This booklet is tailor made for caregivers. People who play the very important role of tending to someone who is sick or in another stressful situation have a unique set of needs.

    Knitting improves health and well-being. Self-care is vital for caregivers, both to be there for the person they are helping and for themselves. This guide features several pages of information about the comforts and benefits of knitting.

    Lion Brand is proud to support Project Knitwell. Their cause is a worthy one, and it's great to use our craft to help others.

    If you would like to donate or volunteer, visit their website to learn more.

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