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Author Archives: Heather Lodinsky

  • The Ups and Downs of Knitting: Counting Your Rows

    You, our readers, asked for it and we're happy to oblige! Designer and teacher Heather Lodinsky joins us for a new article on understanding the fundamentals of your knitting.

    Knowing exactly where you are in a knitting project requires knowing where you have been. “Reading” your stitches by identifying a knit versus a purl stitch is helpful in showing you where you are in a stitch pattern. In the last article I wrote, I showed how to identify the stitches already worked to know where you are in your knitting.

    Sometimes no matter how hard I try, I can easily lose track of which row I am working in a pattern. Life happens—the phone rings, we get talking or we just have to leave our knitting for some reason.  Then I come back to my knitting and…what row was I working? There are various tools out there to help us keep track of our rows. Row counters exist that either attach to your needle, or need to be clicked and there are even “counting boards” where pegs are moved to show what row we are working. Even the simple “hash mark” on a piece of paper works well, but there is still  that human element of just plain forgetting to mark the paper, move the peg or click the counter to the next number. As a knitting teacher, one of the most common questions I am asked is: “What row am I on?”

    A skill as important as identifying your stitches is the ability to count your rows without a “counter”. The best way to count stitches is by first identifying a stitch and then being able to count stitches up and down, which will tell us how many rows we have done and what row we need to work next.

    Counting Rows in Stockinette Stitch

    Stockinette Stitch | Counting Your Rows | Lion Brand Notebook

    Click the image to enlarge.

    Lets’s first look at stockinette stitch – which, when we are working a flat piece, is knitted on the right side  of the fabric and purled on the wrong side.  First, we have to be able to identify a “knit” stitch.  Look closely at the right side of stockinette stitch and see that a knit stitch looks like a “V”.   This is what we are looking for in order to help us count our rows.

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  • Tranquil Tank Top Knit-Along – A Photo-Finish

    KAL badgeWell, I have finished the Tranquil Tank Top and it is still Spring!  It has been great to see pictures of the finished tops that many of you have created during our Spring Knit Along.   If you have not finished, don’t worry – we will keep the posts of this KAL available long after this final post. (Click here to view previous posts.)

    Finishing this top was a fairly quick job, with only 4 seams and sewing the bottom of the left front to the inside of the right front.  No sleeves to set in or stitches to pick up!

    After I finished my front, I turned it over and used some detachable stitch markers to make sure those cast-on stitches for the left front would lay flat and even (I could also have used safety pins for this.)  Just as basting is necessary in machine-sewing a final seam, having your pieces in the correct spot with pins or markers assures that the finishing will progress evenly.

    Tranquil Tank Top Knit-Along – A Photo Finish
    (Click images to enlarge.) 

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  • Tranquil Tank Top Knit-Along -- Knitting on the Flip Side!

    Note: This is the fifth installment of our Spring 2013 Knit-Along. To view previous posts, click here.

    KAL badgeLast week, I finished the left front of the Tranquil Tank Top and this week I have knitted the right side. I really like how this pattern immediately proceeds to the opposite side of the fronts. The right front is the side that is on the outside and is completely worked from stitches that are part of the ribbing. For the left side, I had to cast on stitches, and although these cast on stitches may appear a little loose or uneven, there are no worries as the cast on edge of the left front will be sewn down and hidden on the inside:

    Post 4 Pix 1Post 4 Pix 2

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